Bibi Bombed

The exit polls are in. And if they prove accurate, it is bad news for Binyamin Netanyahu.

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According to the Times of Israel:

The three polls are strikingly similar. They all show a marked decline for Likud-Beytenu, and a dramatic rise from nowhere for Yesh Atid.

But they also all show a majority — albeit a narrow one — for a right-wing/Orthodox alliance.

bibi bombed

You can follow the count here.

About Aussie Dave

An Aussie immigrant to Israel, Aussie Dave is founder of Israellycool, one of the world's most popular pro-Israel blogs (and the one you are currently reading) He is a happy family man, and a lover of steak, Australian sports and girlie drinks

comments

  • juvanya

    61 or 62 seats for Netanyahu-Bennett-Lapid. I am satisfied, altho I will miss Ayoob Kara.

    • Gil Yashar

      Hope you are right. I am worried though that Netanyahu will convince Shelly to backtrack on her promise to never join Likud “for the sake of the nation”. That would mean a Center-Left gvt. with 72-74 seats. Or another scenario, convincing Shas and Yesh Atid to sit together “for the sake of the nation”, meaning a Center-Left-Religious gvt. with 67-69 seats. I am afraid that Bibi will do anything not to join with Bayit Yehudi for the following reasons:
      1. To calm Obama and Europe that the two states model is still on the table.
      2. Out of bad blood between him and Bennett and ridiculously between Sara and Bennett.

      • NormanF

        Both of those hypotheses are correct:

        Crudely put, Netanyahu fears Obama.

        And Netanyahu fears Sara.

        When meeting two immovable forces, he backs down.

        If needed, he’ll take Bennett into the government.

        But only after he has nailed down the Left first.

  • Jim from Iowa

    Sounds like a weak, divided government no matter how it’s formed. Back to elections in a year or two, I guess. What I really want to know is this: in the next several weeks as the various political factions make their backroom deals, who is really calling the shots – the King (Bibi) or the King-maker (Rabbi Ovadia Yosef)?

    • juvanya

      Not likely. Shas is out. Lapid is the kingmaker.

  • walt kovacs

    the system is broken…fix it

    that someone could be elected pm and still lose…makes no sense

  • Norman B.

    The vote was determined largely by domestic issues, such as strengthening the social safety net and reigning in the Haredis. There is an apparently broad consensus on foreign policy, as Labor and other opposition parties de-emphasized it. Accordingly, I expect Netanyahu to form his new coalition based on these internal matters rather than a stance on the moribund peace process.

    • Jim from Iowa

      Well, that’s one way to interpret the results of the election. Another is that this was a none-too-gentle way to nudge Bibi into a better working relationship with Obama. It’s hard to see that the Israelis are embracing an uncompromising hawkish foreign policy or that they’re completely happy with the Likud-brand status quo with the Palestinians. I agree that domestic issues were more important to the electorate, but foriegn policy still matters to them.

      • Norman B.

        Israel’s foreign policy only appears uncompromisingly hawkish because Arab genocidal intent is as constant as the speed of light. Should there be a genuine move toward compromise by the PA, I predict Israel will be forthcoming. However, I have yet to see any carrots or sticks coming from Washington to move the Arabs onto the right track.

      • Inessa

        It seems the Israelis want to take a break from the focus on foreign policy including Obama and Palestenians, and focus on making their day to day lives more comfortable. Lapid doesn’t sound like obama’s lackey by a long shot. He doesn’t want to compromise on Jerusalem, he wants to conscript Israeli Arabs, and he said he doesn’t believe Arabs really want peace…

        • Jim from Iowa

          The more I hear about Lapid, the better I like him. Part of the problem with the Netanyahu-Obama relationship was having a neanderthal like Avigdor Lieberman as foreign minister serving as any kind of reliable, constructive diplomatic back-up to the prime minister. Maybe since Evette’s indictment has caused him to vacate the post, Lapid could fill the position. He couldn’t do any worse than Lieberman.

          • walt kovacs

            why should bibi or israel trust an america that despite all the signs of an islamist gov now running egypt, would still provide military aide to that country?

            its insane

            and screw all the arabs in the socalled west bank

            just watched the academy award nominated 5 broken cameras

            they are all about lies

            i was in country before the first intifada…i knew what it looked like

            where they say they had farm land…was barren…israel never kept them from farming or building…they chose not to

            a village of less than 200 people cannot claim acres and acres of land

            lucky im not the pm…i would set up a drive in right outside the village…play that movie over and over…while i took tractors and plowed it over…

            • Jim from Iowa

              The Palestinians – can’t live with ‘em; can’t live without ‘em.

              • Inessa

                Could definitely live without them… happily

  • rulierose

    as a Jewish American, with little knowledge of the Israeli system of politics (other than it sounds incredibly complicated and combative, and of course so very Jewish; as my parents always said, get three Jews together you’ll have four opinions)…

    but I think you should give Bibi a lot of credit for standing up to Obama as much as he has done. he smartly doesn’t want to piss Obama off any more than necessary–but frankly, Obama doesn’t like him and Bibi is not going to be able to change that, unless he just rolls over and plays dead.

    and he won’t do that, although I wouldn’t have minded if Operation Pillar of Cast Lead Part 2 had lasted a few weeks longer…