Debate Between Israeli And Saudi Former Intelligence Heads

Today in Brussels, the German Marshall Fund of the United States (GMF) hosted the first public panel discussion between Prince Turki bin Faisal Al Saud, former Saudi head of intelligence,  and General Amos Yadlin, former Israeli head of military intelligence.

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An Aussie immigrant to Israel, Aussie Dave is founder and managing editor of Israellycool, one of the world's most popular pro-Israel blogs (and the one you are currently reading) He is a happy family man, and a lover of steak, Australian sports and girlie drinks

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  • Mike Lasowsky

    What is Yadlin doing with this filthy Saudi?

  • David Sucher

    I thought it was an interesting discussion, particularly that Prince Turki said he would like to see peace with Israel in his lifetime so he could pray at the mosque in Jerusalem and to eat fresh Jaffa oranges. Perhaps it would have been inappropriate but I would have loved to have seen, in real time, General Yadlin invite him.

    Thx for posting it.

    • Ira Rosen

      I would love to have had it pointed out that Prince Turki could do so today, while General Yadlin (whom I assume is Jewish) could not pray in public in Saudi Arabia.

      • John Gibbs

        Not really the case, _possibly_ unless he crossed from Jordan. Saudi Arabia is on the “can’t travel to Israel” enemies list. Your point about religious freedom in Saudi Arabia is valid but please do your homework!

        • Ira Rosen

          So Saudi Arabia would prevent him from traveling? That’s just supporting my point. I imagine if he wanted to pray there today, Israel would make arrangements. Thank you for validating my point.

          • John Gibbs

            My point was he would not be able to travel to Israel on a Saudi passport due to Israeli law as it stands, irrespective of Saudi law (which, yes, would also stop him from travelling there). The “you can’t travel to country x” thing swings both ways, not trying to make any political point just setting the facts straight.

            • Ira Rosen

              My original point was about prayer, not travel. Muslims are free to pray anywhere in Israel. Jews are not free to pray in public in Saudi Arabia, nor can they bring religious items into the country. Your point about travel is understood, and uncontested. My point about prayer stands. I have done my homework.

              • John Gibbs

                Agreed :)

      • John Gibbs

        Not really the case, _possibly_ unless he crossed from Jordan. Saudi Arabia is on the “can’t travel to Israel” enemies list. Your point about religious freedom in Saudi Arabia is valid but please do your homework!

  • Ahmad

    This is the problem with
    you Jews. You call us filthy. We were able to accept and being accepted by all
    mankind accept you lovely Jews. I remember once in 2006 when I was doing my MBA
    at the states, a group of classmates were extremely upset from the professor and
    all of the sudden one of them said he must be a Jew…

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