More results...

Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors

More results...

Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors

Return to dAWK

It’s been a while since I visited the website of our old friend dAWK, but it seems like he is up to his old tricks. And by “tricks”, I mean posting anti-Israel propaganda without any proof to back up his claims.

 

dAWK writes:

In October 2004, an Israeli army captain unloaded the magazine of his automatic weapon into a 13-year-old Palestinian girl who was laying on the ground dying after being shot from an army outpost in Gaza.  And,

The Southern Command court on Tuesday acquitted Israel Defense Forces Captain “R” of all charges relating to the killing.

Notice how dAWK states with certainty what happened. To dAWK, there is no doubt that the officer unloaded his magazine into the dying girl. This, despite the fact that the officer was acquitted for very real reasons.

The captain maintained his innocence, charging that he never performed a “confirmed kill” and accused his soldiers of deliberately wanting to hurt him for his stubborn attitude on duty.

 

In February 2005, a main witness decided to withdraw his initial testimony against the suspect, accusing soldiers in the base of providing false testimonies to harm the captain, whose strictness they disliked.

 

Unable to reach a conclusive verdict, a team of military judges visited the scene of the incident under heavy security and listened to the suspect’s version of events. A review of a video tape recorded by the army on October 5, 2004, showed a suspicious figure in the area as the girl approached the base.

 

This missing link supported the captain’s testimony that he feared the girl was sent by terrorists to draw IDF soldiers out of the base and carry out a shooting attack.

Curiously, dAWK chooses to ignore all of this, although he states:  

Such a judgment warrants further discussion:

However, for dAWK, “discussion” seems to constitute any opinion that conforms to his worldview, as evidenced by his linking to the following opinion piece, which is also from Ynetnews (the same site that ran the above story explaining the verdict).

 

Not satisfied with this attempted hatchet job, dAWK next tries to impugn the IDF by claiming that they orchestrated a failed terror attack.

While on the topic of the Israeli army, isn’t it just a bit odd that the day after Condi Rice told Israel to let up on the checkpoints, a Palestinian youth at a checkpoint is found with an explosives belt?

Gee, how odd it is that the minute Israel relaxes security at the checkpoints, a terrorist tries to get through with an explosive belt.

 

But dAWK has his own logic. He tries to show that the English and Hebrew reports on the incident differed. Despite the fact that he never looked at the Hebrew reports himself (and doesn’t know Hebrew anyway), he feels confident enough in linking to someone else. Which is all well and good, if you provide a working link. However, the link he provides does not work, and all we have is his word.

And to top it off, why do the reports in Hebrew and the ones in English differ? I’ll let Dorothy from New Profile explain.

There are several things to be said about the report regarding the “explosive belt”. One odd factor is that the English and Hebrew websites of the report differ. Both Ha’aretz and Ynet in Hebrew as well as this evening’s news on channel one TV claim that the so-called “explosive belt” was a dummy rather than real. But both newspapers’ English websites have it as real.

 

Doesn’t matter. The entire incident was likely orchestrated.

I would like to see these original reports myself. Having said that, even if they did differ (which I doubt), this is no proof of the incident being orchestrated. Neither is this:

During the past year or 2 there have been several incidents reported of youngsters trying to get through the Huara checkpoint with explosives, and of having been caught.

 

The question that warrants asking is “why would anyone try to get explosives through a checkpoint?” There are so many easier and surer ways to get from the West Bank into Israel proper, and Palestinians (as well as internationals and Israelis opposing the occupation) know these. Moreover, the Huara checkpoint is not into Israel, but between Palestinian communities. Finally, anyone familiar with the Huara checkpoint must find it a particularly odd choice to try to send explosives through it, even when on youngsters. The Huara checkpoint is one of the nastiest, as is well known to Palestinians (but not to the average Israeli reader and those elsewhere in the world unfamiliar with the situation here, and who are likely to believe propaganda). So even if one were to stupidly choose to go through a checkpoint with explosives, Huara would be one of the least likely checkpoints to attempt getting through.

While I am not familar with the Huara checkpoint, and am therefore not in a position to contradict dAWK’s assertion that it is very difficult to send explosives through it, I do not believe that this constitutes a proof that the boy did not, nevertheless, attempt to do so. Besides, who says he wanted to get the explosives through the checkpoint. After all, over a year ago, at this very checkpoint, another neo palestinian youngster was caught wearing an explosives belt – with no intention of getting through the checkpoint, but rather carrying out an attack against the soldiers at the checkpoint.

 

So there’s dAWK for you. Still angry. Still white. Still kidding.

About the author

Picture of David Lange

David Lange

A law school graduate, David Lange transitioned from work in the oil and hi-tech industries into fulltime Israel advocacy. He is a respected commentator and Middle East analyst who has often been cited by the mainstream media
Picture of David Lange

David Lange

A law school graduate, David Lange transitioned from work in the oil and hi-tech industries into fulltime Israel advocacy. He is a respected commentator and Middle East analyst who has often been cited by the mainstream media
Scroll to Top