Now The Jews Are Going To Get It

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Two stories about Oxfam and then I’ll get to the meat of this post: Oxfam in the UK in 1967.

From Belgium: Oxfam has ex-terrorist as President (auto translation).

Guido Van Hecken, President of ‘ Oxfam-Solidarity ‘, is an ex-terrorist who was involved in the active terrible terrorist attack of the ANC in Pretoria from 1983, those 19 dead and hundreds of injured made. There were already suspicions in that direction, but his accomplice, Hélène P, it has recently confessed in HUMO. That an Association for development aid led by an ex-terrorist is to us know a European first.

From Holland: Farah Karimi, General Director of Oxfam, former member of The Mojahedin-E Khalgh (auto translation).



Between 1985 and 1986 Karimi worked for the Mojahedin-e Khalgh in Paris where she developed untrue stories for refugees.[3] In 1986 she broke finally with Mojahedin-E Khalgh. In her book the secret of fire Karimi described her political awakening (2005) in her youth in Iran, her experience with Mojahedin-E Khalgh and her break with this organization. The Mojahedin-E Khalgh, the European Union and the United States of America to 2008 considered a terrorist organisation. … In november 2007 she was appointed General Director of Oxfam

So now lets hop back to 1967 in the UK and hear about a senior Oxfam director in the UK.

Brietbart’s site has an absolutely astonishing piece right now by a friend of mine. Douglas Davis was, for a very long time, the top Jerusalem Post person in London and a senior editor of the paper. He is impeccable and this story about Oxfam, from 1967 no less, absolutely blows my mind. You must read the whole piece but I’m extracting the bombshell that lands in the middle:

But my Oxfam Moment came one summer’s evening when a senior Oxfam executive invited me to dinner at his sumptuous home in the rolling Oxfordshire countryside. He was cultured, brilliant and cool. Every inch the top Foreign Office diplomat, which had indeed been his previous calling. Before dinner, he suggested we take drinks on the lawn. As an afterthought, he asked the butler to bring out his portable radio so that we could listen to the news. It was, after all, the first day of the Six Day War.

The BBC faithfully reported claims by the Israelis that they had destroyed the air forces of Egypt and Syria on the ground. Then, the newsreader intoned the Arab claims that they had inflicted extensive damage on the Israeli army; that Egyptian tanks were advancing; that they were now 25 kilometres from Tel Aviv.

My urbane host lost his cultivated cool. His elderly body shot into the air, fists pumping at the skies: ‘Now the Jews are going to get it… Now they’re going to get it.’ Remember, Israel occupied no territories, nor had it constructed a single settlement. There could be only one explanation for his jubilation: the prospect of Israel’s imminent destruction. When he recovered his composure, he raised his glass and beamed at me: ‘Wonderful news. Simply wonderful.’ I stared back, shocked, not knowing how to respond. To my shame, I said nothing.

Read the whole thing.

That is the the British establishment opinion of Jews. It was long before 1948 when we Jews reclaimed our home. It was when Jews were being slaughtered and were denied entry to the home the British were mandated to give us.

This happened in 1967, as Jews fought tooth and nail to live. It was before “occupation”, “settlements” or of today’s invented casus beli  which are used to deny our right to a Jewish homeland in Israel.

The prevailing sentiment of the British establishment was then and is now Jew hatred. There are many exceptional individuals who buck this trend, but the default position is to suspect Jews. They give an almost free pass to Arabs. It’s been this way since time immemorial. It is this way today.

This is a story from 1967 and it’s written by someone I trust beyond all shadow of a doubt.

Nothing in the UK has changed for the better: if anything it has got worse. It is this deep suspicion of Jews that drove me out of the UK. I felt it in my work and in my private life. It made me uncomfortable enough to move country.

I would not bring up my Jewish child in the UK today. I’m sorry if I offend those of you living in the UK but there is something very rotten at the core of the people who most often run your country.

An old album cover… Pink Floyd and Oxfam working together.
An old album cover… Pink Floyd and Oxfam working together.
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